Flathead Valley, Montana
406-751-2175 info@flatheadeyh.org
motivating young women in science + mathematics

FAQs

Q?

What should my student bring to the conference?

A.

Students should come dressed for indoor and outdoor events and wear clothing and shoes suitable for physical activities. An empty water bottle that can be filled at fountains is encouraged.

Q?

When will my student learn what workshops she will attend?

A.

Students will receive their workshop assignments when they pick up their registration packet the morning of the conference.

Q?

Is there a fee?

A.

Yes, the conference cost is $15 per student. This includes all materials, conference tote, snacks and lunch. Some schools have grants that pay the fee for students. Check with your student’s school for details.

Q?

What if I cannot afford the registration fee?

A.

Scholarships are available for students who need assistance. You will be able to request a scholarship on the registration form.

Q?

Are refunds possible?

A.

Unfortunately, the registration fee cannot be refunded.

Q?

How does my student travel to and from the event?

A.

Check with your student’s school. Some can arrange buses others form parent car pools.

Q?

How does my student register for the conference?

A.

Registration forms will be sent home by the school (ask your daughter about it, sometimes forms wallow in the bottom of their backpacks) If her school is not participating, one can be emailed to you by our committee. Parents/guardians must complete and sign and return the registration to their student’s school with payment as directed by the school, or to the committee if registering individually

Q?

If my student’s school is not attending, can I register her myself?

A.

Yes, use the contact page on the website and the committee chair will guide you through registration. You will be responsible for transportation.

Q?

Why is the event only for girls?

A.

“Girls continue to be underrepresented in critical fields related to math and science. They make up only a third of AP physics students…and only 15 percent of AP computer science classes. At the college level, less than 20 percent of engineering majors are women. The number of women with computer science degrees has dropped 25 percent since 1985.” — U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings’ delivered remarks to the first National Summit on the Advancement of Girls in Math and Science in Washington, D.C. May 15, 2006.

A study by the American Association of University Women found that the critical years where girls lose interest in math and science are the 7-10th grade. Through fun, hands-on activities; education and career exploration; and peer support and professional mentors, the Flathead EYH conference aims to foster awareness and stimulate girls’ interests in STEM fields.